11 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

There are no women in Women (of course); the band is comprised of four young Canadian men with a knack for making inscrutable pop music that eschews verse-chorus-verse songwriting in favor of tunes that march and shuffle along to waves of feedback, or dissonant guitars, or sharp, angular rhythms. Public Strain is their second full-length release, and it continues very much in the vein of their 2008 eponymous debut, with tracks like “Narrow With the Hall” and “Locust Valley” sounding like indie-pop wannabes while songs like “Can’t You See” and “Bells” are oddly enchanting pop outliers that poke and prod. The jutting, spastic guitars of “China Steps” and “Heat Distraction” faintly evoke Can and Captain Beefheart (respectively), and the noisy post-punk of “Drag Open” borrows from Thurston Moore’s “Dissonance for Dummies.” With producer and psych-pop musician Chad VanGaalen again at the helm, Public Strain creeps stealthily into the listener’s psyche, where it will likely live long after “Eyesore” has faded to its bittersweet, but hopeful, end.

EDITORS’ NOTES

There are no women in Women (of course); the band is comprised of four young Canadian men with a knack for making inscrutable pop music that eschews verse-chorus-verse songwriting in favor of tunes that march and shuffle along to waves of feedback, or dissonant guitars, or sharp, angular rhythms. Public Strain is their second full-length release, and it continues very much in the vein of their 2008 eponymous debut, with tracks like “Narrow With the Hall” and “Locust Valley” sounding like indie-pop wannabes while songs like “Can’t You See” and “Bells” are oddly enchanting pop outliers that poke and prod. The jutting, spastic guitars of “China Steps” and “Heat Distraction” faintly evoke Can and Captain Beefheart (respectively), and the noisy post-punk of “Drag Open” borrows from Thurston Moore’s “Dissonance for Dummies.” With producer and psych-pop musician Chad VanGaalen again at the helm, Public Strain creeps stealthily into the listener’s psyche, where it will likely live long after “Eyesore” has faded to its bittersweet, but hopeful, end.

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