13 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Like her brother Rufus, Martha Wainwright makes music that’s at once forthright and over the top. On her self-titled first full-length, she merges dreamy pop and folk-rock with lyrical details that reflect a not always happy life. But strength and sensuality radiate from these tunes. It’s hard to believe that she doesn’t already see herself like “the boys (who) run faster and . . . throw harder.” Wainwright also rains a spectacular dis on father Loudon’s head with “Bloody . . .,” a surprisingly (given its title) measured song of disgust that nonetheless makes Alanis Morissette’s “You Oughta Know” sound like a Radio Disney jingle. The balance of anger and beauty on Martha Wainwright gives a glimpse of a unique singer/songwriter with much promise — some of it already fulfilled here.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Like her brother Rufus, Martha Wainwright makes music that’s at once forthright and over the top. On her self-titled first full-length, she merges dreamy pop and folk-rock with lyrical details that reflect a not always happy life. But strength and sensuality radiate from these tunes. It’s hard to believe that she doesn’t already see herself like “the boys (who) run faster and . . . throw harder.” Wainwright also rains a spectacular dis on father Loudon’s head with “Bloody . . .,” a surprisingly (given its title) measured song of disgust that nonetheless makes Alanis Morissette’s “You Oughta Know” sound like a Radio Disney jingle. The balance of anger and beauty on Martha Wainwright gives a glimpse of a unique singer/songwriter with much promise — some of it already fulfilled here.

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