13 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Future Breeds marks Hot Hot Heat's return to the realm of independently run music labels (in this case, Dangerbird Records). So for the first time in awhile, the band was free to write songs instead of calculated radio hits, though you might not realize that after listening to the quirky and contagious “Times a Thousand.” That track is awesome enough for radio airplay but weird enough to satiate those more ardent fans who've been following the band since its 2002 EP for Sub Pop, Knock Knock Knock. “Implosionatic” is just as (if not more) catchy, eschewing post-punk tomfoolery for straight-up song hooks bursting from a fast and punchy guitar-pop number with distorted synthesizers. The keyboards get even dirtier-sounding on “JFK’s LSD,” accompanying the disco-punk beats and high-on-the-neck bass runs associated with the skinny-tie and white-belted second coming of Britpop. The band makes free jazz–inspired interludes work well on “Zero Results,” while robotic angularity of Devo proportions helps make “Yvr” one heck of a standout opening cut.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Future Breeds marks Hot Hot Heat's return to the realm of independently run music labels (in this case, Dangerbird Records). So for the first time in awhile, the band was free to write songs instead of calculated radio hits, though you might not realize that after listening to the quirky and contagious “Times a Thousand.” That track is awesome enough for radio airplay but weird enough to satiate those more ardent fans who've been following the band since its 2002 EP for Sub Pop, Knock Knock Knock. “Implosionatic” is just as (if not more) catchy, eschewing post-punk tomfoolery for straight-up song hooks bursting from a fast and punchy guitar-pop number with distorted synthesizers. The keyboards get even dirtier-sounding on “JFK’s LSD,” accompanying the disco-punk beats and high-on-the-neck bass runs associated with the skinny-tie and white-belted second coming of Britpop. The band makes free jazz–inspired interludes work well on “Zero Results,” while robotic angularity of Devo proportions helps make “Yvr” one heck of a standout opening cut.

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