11 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After returning to his emo-folk roots with a solo acoustic tour (captured on the 2018 live set Guide Me Back Home), Dallas Green brings full-band strength to the first proper City and Colour LP since 2015’s If I Should Go Before You. And, as if to make up for the nearly half-decade gap between studio albums, he’s returned with some of the biggest-sounding music of his career. With A Pill for Loneliness, City and Colour send their rugged roots rock into the cosmos: The lone-wolf anthem “Astronaut” lives up to its interstellar promise with a Verve-like sway that slowly builds into a heady space-rock jam, while “Strangers” takes flight with an urgent motorik rhythm and mind-bending synth textures. But even as his sonic explorations lead him to uncharted territory, Green’s lyrical concerns remain down-to-earth, as he uses his eternally sweet voice to deliver sentiments about dysfunctional relationships and emotional isolation. “So many f**king pointless conversations about who’s right or wrong—you or me,” he sings wearily on “Me and the Moonlight,” seeking escape from his problems through the song’s Spiritualized-like haze. There may be no easy cure for heartache, but a little psychedelia helps soothe the soul.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After returning to his emo-folk roots with a solo acoustic tour (captured on the 2018 live set Guide Me Back Home), Dallas Green brings full-band strength to the first proper City and Colour LP since 2015’s If I Should Go Before You. And, as if to make up for the nearly half-decade gap between studio albums, he’s returned with some of the biggest-sounding music of his career. With A Pill for Loneliness, City and Colour send their rugged roots rock into the cosmos: The lone-wolf anthem “Astronaut” lives up to its interstellar promise with a Verve-like sway that slowly builds into a heady space-rock jam, while “Strangers” takes flight with an urgent motorik rhythm and mind-bending synth textures. But even as his sonic explorations lead him to uncharted territory, Green’s lyrical concerns remain down-to-earth, as he uses his eternally sweet voice to deliver sentiments about dysfunctional relationships and emotional isolation. “So many f**king pointless conversations about who’s right or wrong—you or me,” he sings wearily on “Me and the Moonlight,” seeking escape from his problems through the song’s Spiritualized-like haze. There may be no easy cure for heartache, but a little psychedelia helps soothe the soul.

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