14 Songs, 56 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In 1989, having long since conquered the world as a solo artist, David Bowie did what any genius pop star would do: he joined a band. Tin Machine's debut is a swaggering, jagged, purposefully messy hard rock record centred on Reeves Gabrels' howling, angular guitar lines. Tracks like the bluesy "Crack City", the driving “Under the God” and the dissonant "Prisoner of Love" evoke Sonic Youth and the Pixies, even as they prefigure the grunge revolution that had yet to come.

EDITORS’ NOTES

In 1989, having long since conquered the world as a solo artist, David Bowie did what any genius pop star would do: he joined a band. Tin Machine's debut is a swaggering, jagged, purposefully messy hard rock record centred on Reeves Gabrels' howling, angular guitar lines. Tracks like the bluesy "Crack City", the driving “Under the God” and the dissonant "Prisoner of Love" evoke Sonic Youth and the Pixies, even as they prefigure the grunge revolution that had yet to come.

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