21 Songs, 1 Hour 17 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

If you arrived here as a fan of Jack Nitzsche’s production and arrangements with Neil Young, Tim Buckley, and/or Phil Spector’s Wrecking Crew, the 21-cut Three Piece Suite has something for both ardent fans and the casually curious. The simply titled “#6” sets the tone for the other 20 tracks with dramatic orchestral swells that immediately call to mind a similar arrangement for Buffalo Springfield’s “Expecting to Fly.” As the song crescendos in a flurry of ascending notes, a palpable anxiety is born from the performance. The transformation from lighter movements to darker and more urgent moments in “#2” also recall those arranged for Young’s “A Man Needs a Maid” (which would have sounded much less creepy without Nitzsche’s cinematic-sounding score). “Lower California” gives direct nods to Brian Wilson and The Beach Boys with a crisp and balanced mix in the spirit of Todd Rundgren. “Who Say What to Who” balances on a boogie between '70s David Bowie and Mott the Hoople before the song shape-shifts into the string-laden standout “I’m the Loneliest Fool.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

If you arrived here as a fan of Jack Nitzsche’s production and arrangements with Neil Young, Tim Buckley, and/or Phil Spector’s Wrecking Crew, the 21-cut Three Piece Suite has something for both ardent fans and the casually curious. The simply titled “#6” sets the tone for the other 20 tracks with dramatic orchestral swells that immediately call to mind a similar arrangement for Buffalo Springfield’s “Expecting to Fly.” As the song crescendos in a flurry of ascending notes, a palpable anxiety is born from the performance. The transformation from lighter movements to darker and more urgent moments in “#2” also recall those arranged for Young’s “A Man Needs a Maid” (which would have sounded much less creepy without Nitzsche’s cinematic-sounding score). “Lower California” gives direct nods to Brian Wilson and The Beach Boys with a crisp and balanced mix in the spirit of Todd Rundgren. “Who Say What to Who” balances on a boogie between '70s David Bowie and Mott the Hoople before the song shape-shifts into the string-laden standout “I’m the Loneliest Fool.”

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