10 Songs, 53 Minutes

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Ratings and Reviews

5.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

bobr53 ,

What great music

Love Marlene’s music. She is so talented and amazing.

Bassmama1 ,

Serious listener of jazz

A great review from a serious listener of jazz, our friend Geoff Mirelowitz, had this to say about the listening of the MLK-Convergence CD.

"Wow! Worth the wait -- and then some. First impressions:

The album swings from the opening notes. Individually and collectively everyone is "in the pocket." Yet it seems effortless because...that's what happens with jazz in the hands of masters. It's no accident you're in such esteemed company here Marlene.

The extra swing from Christian's duo with you on bass on "And Still We Rise" is a treat. I also love the arco on "Visions." Both of the Stevie Wonder cuts are a reminder that there's still plenty of opportunities for jazz musicians to make terrific use of Stevie's compositions. "Rain" is gorgeous, just as it was on Kenny's album with Dave Holland, which is testimony to the quality of your bass playing. The spoken prose on "Not the Song I Want to Sing," bears repeated listening and the "double bass" alongside Lewis's drums set it off perfectly.

On first listen it sure sounds as if the recording and mastering match the quality of the musicianship. I felt like I could reach out and touch each one of the instruments, and especially the bass.

Finally your sincere liner notes capture what many of us feel at this moment in history. Bravo!

Thank you; to you, the three master musicians who joined you and everyone -- including my man Stan -- who contributed to this album. I know I'll be listening over and over again."

STAN THE MAN LEE ,

MLK CONVERGENCE

MARLENE ROSENBERG / MLK CONVERGENCE.

This is that kinda recording... Back in the day when new records would come out, they were so anticipated, and you were so excited about hearing the whole entire album from front to back. Because you knew conceptually, that the artist had something to say, something to hear, they intentionally put it all together from front to back. So the fans would go running, or on the bus, or driving to get the record on the day it was released... The fans would invite friends over to have a listening party, with food and drinks to just listen to the whole project from front to back. Not talking over it, just listening, try that with “Marlene’s MLK-Convergence.”

This recording is a gift to the listeners. Marlene’s solos throughout the entire recording, is simply beautiful, a breath of fresh air of taking her or commanding her instrument to reaching creativity ideas. The first track is America Violet, it’s a out cry of the violence manipulation of humanity, Marlene start the track off with a solo introduction of a 1960 feel of the Cilvil Right Movement. From the first track on the story of life and struggle begins. I feel fortunate with love that I witnessed the transformation of Marlene’s hard work and struggle as she struck off from the beginning of this envision project, and from day one she knew that she wanted world renowned drummer Lewis Nash and NEA Jazz Master pianist Kenny Barron to accompany her on this project. This project did not just happen by chance, it was created on one nigh, after one of Marlene’s gig as a leader, with her Class Act band, with Lewis Nash on drums, Trombone Michael Deases, pianist Reggie Thomas and Vocalist Marion Sullivan. Later that night for a drink , and good conversations Marlene, Lewis Nash and I Stan Lee, decided that this project should be done and titled MLK, representing each one of the names of this brilliant trio. MLK - Convergence is an acronym for Marlene, Lewis and Kenny and of course the iconic, great American leader Martin Luther King Jr.
Added bonus to the project is that it’s produced by bassist Christian McBride, and pianist Robert Irving who was Miles Davis Music supervisor for some years. The great entrepreneur Tom Burrell who is the pioneer in launching black advertisements, and was the first black man to do a advertisement commercials for McDonald’s and Coca-Cola that featured African Americans. Bassis Christian McBride accompanied bassist Marlene on two of tracks, making for a whole lot of bass going on- InWalkJazz